This site uses cookies to provide you with more responsive and personalized service and to collect certain information about your use of the site.  You can change your cookie settings through your browser.  If you continue without changing your settings, you agree to our use of cookies.  See our Privacy Policy for more information.

Daily Devotional | This Is My Father's World

Devotions

My family enjoys watching nature shows together. It is stunning to see the diversity of animals and habitats that exist in the world. While most science shows do not give God the credit for creation, watching them often leads my family to have conversations about how creative and powerful our God is.

The author of Psalm 104 would have made a good scientist. He carefully observes many aspects of the created world in order to praise God. He observes the water cycle. He recognizes that rain sustains the life of animals and makes crops grow (vv. 10–14). The water cycle is not an impersonal process, but rather evidence of God’s faithfulness and kindness.

The author notices that some animals come out and hunt in the night and sleep during the day, while people work during the day and sleep at night (vv. 19–23). Everything has its proper time and place. The ocean is still unexplored in many places. And, on occasion, the news will report of a new species that’s been discovered. It is a reminder to us that God cares about the animal world. He did not simply create them for humans. Rather, this psalm reminds us that God created them for His own delight (vv. 24–26). Indeed, the Psalmist proclaims, “May the Lord rejoice in his works” (v. 31).

The sheer diversity and wonder of the created world should inspire us to join with the Psalmist in praise to God. Surely, “[h]ow many are your works, Lord! In wisdom you made them all; the earth is full of your creatures” (v. 24). Today’s reading is a good reminder to open our eyes and allow the wonder of creation to inspire us to praise God.

>> Take time today to observe and celebrate God’s magnificent creation. While today human sin has corrupted God’s creation (v. 35), we can look forward to its redemption and restoration when Christ returns (Rom. 8:22–25).

BY Ryan Cook

Dr. Ryan Cook has taught at Moody Bible Institute since 2012. He earned his bachelor of arts in Bible and Theology from Moody and his master of arts in Old Testament from Grand Rapids Theological Seminary. He has worked in Christian education and served as a pastor in Michigan for seven years. During his time as a professor at Moody, he earned his doctorate from Asbury Theological Seminary. He now lives with his wife, Ashley, and their three children in the Chicagoland area.

Find Daily Devotionals by Month